Crisis comms, Twitter tools, Facebook rules & the changing newspaper world: 4 top reads this week

Here are four of the most interesting reads I’ve found on the web this week:

‘Cut out and keep’ guide to crisis management – Catherine Lane covers the basics of how to respond to a crisis – the rest is up to us! Speed, clarity and establishing yourself as the trustworthy source of information are key.

Embed a tweet within a tweet – I love a new little trick and I really like this one, which allows you to link to a tweet in your tweet and have an image preview of that tweet appear underneath your comment. Brilliant if you want to comment but just don’t have enough characters. It also means you’re including an ‘image’ with your tweet too, helping boost your tweet’s engagement rate – brilliant.

Facebook is demolishing the like gate – From November, Facebook no longer wants page owners to incentivise people to ‘like’ their pages – so you won’t be allowed to prevent people from entering a competition or getting a discount if they haven’t ‘liked’ your page. The aim is to make sure that page likes are really genuine – that they come from users who want to stay in touch with the content on your page. I’ve never used a ‘like gate’ on any of my pages, but have run competitions where users have been asked to ‘like’ the page to enter. I think there is a place for this, if the thing you’re giving away is specifically relevant to the page you manage – e.g. a Spa business giving away a pamper day – you would hope the kind of people who would enter are local to that place and interested in attending that Spa. Therefore, asking them to ‘like’ the page seems perfectly reasonable as it should be in line with their interests. However, if that same Spa was giving away £50 cash and you had to ‘like’ the page to qualify, then the potential competition entrants may not be interested in the Spa business at all and you can see the problem. Maybe there’s room for some discretion on this one – what do you think?

David Dinsmore: ‘We aren’t as obsessed by the Daily Mail as we used to be’ – Not the most popular newspaper around my part of the world, but still interesting to read Sun editor David Dinsmore’s views on how the newspaper industry is changing around him. He says that:  “In this hugely fragmented media environment, we understand that our competitive set is not other papers. It’s Google, Facebook and BuzzFeed, even Netflix, as much as the Mail. And it’s also Alton Towers and where you go shopping.”

 

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